Podcast on Spanish Podcasting

I am delighted to let you know that Craig Wealand (from La mansión del inglés)  and myself have teamed up to produce the podcast En clave de podcast – uncovering Spanish podcasting, in order to find out what on Earth is going on in that medium in Spain.

So far, we’re loving it.

But instead of writing about it, let us tell you about the show in this introductory episode cero. (And if you want to read about it, here’s the blog: https://enclavedepodcast.com/

I hope you enjoy it – espero que os guste.

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E is for En vivo y en directo

Join myself and other indie content creators connected to Spain for these two live events on Sunday 25th January 2015!

INDIE CONTENT CREATORS DAY: JANUARY 25TH
 
Each year, more people are trying to discover how to transform their creative ideas from paper into a finished product: whether that be a book, a video, a podcast or a image.
 
As much as the web is portrayed as an exciting new opportunity everyone, the reality is that the process of independently creating, completing, promoting, distributing and retailing a creative work can be really challenging for many people.
 
To show how anyone can take those first important steps, we have gathered together six very different creative individuals on January 25th, to share their experiences and insights on how to produce, exhibit, publish and sell photographic or fine art, ebooks or paperbacks, videos, audiobooks or podcasts.
 
 
The FaceBook Event Comprises of Two Sessions:
 
  • 1: A Google Hangout Session in which 4 panel members will be discussing – the changing model of work in a digital age, how to keep motivated and creative with digital tools, how the Spanish connection influences and shapes our work . You can follow the discussion live on Google Plus or YouTube at 12.00 noon (Spain). Check on the FB Event page for details of this hangout.
  • 2: At 17.00 – 19.00 (Spain) there will be an open FaceBook Event. At least 6 panel members will gather to discuss more on these issues, and offer practical steps to getting your creative endeavours out into the digital marketplaces. They will be answering questions from anyone who joins the event, as well as offering up free examples of our work over the course of the 2 hours (Including Amazon free books, free audio files, Free Photo book PDF’s) so everyone will have concrete example of the sort of work that can be created online.
 
If you have ever wanted to write that book, develop those photographic skills, start a podcast or an video Channel on YouTube, or have been interested in the whole process of Independent Content Creation online, then don’t miss this one-off event.
 
Drop by the FaceBook Event page, and click on the “Going” button. – This way you’ll be notified over the coming week of links to materials, links to the live hangout and updates on our special, and growing list of guests.
 
LINKS: 
FB organisers page: Craving Distraction:www.facebook.com/cravingdistraction
Twitter Hashtag: #Jan25indieEvent
indiecreatorsposter

The A to Z of Spanish Christmas – Podcast

In the first of two special episodes on The A to Z of Spanish Christmas, I talk about

Aguinaldo
Belén
Campanadas
Dulces
Estoy como unas pascuas
Fruta escarchada
Gallo (misa del)
Historia
Inocentes
Juguetes
K – no K, sorry.
Lotería
Mazapán

Please follow this link to listen to the podcast, www.spainuncoveredpodcast.net/spanish-christmas-1/

or look for Spain Uncovered in iTunes, Stitcher of your favourite podcast app.

U is for Uvas

It’s Christmas time!

I’ve completely neglected this blog while I’ve been setting up the Spain Uncovered podcast and building up that site. But I’m back! And as it’s Christmas time, I wanted to share with you one of the chapters from the A to Z of Spanish Culture: U is for Uvas, where I talk through some of the Spanish Christmas traditions, or at least, through some of the ones I’ve come across throughout my life.

Here it is.

Feliz navidad.

G is for Guiri. Happy Guiri.

Who is the Happy Guiri?

He (or she, they can also be a she) is a person currently away from the land they grew up in.

That doesn’t mean they’re not happy. On the contrary. The happy guiris, by their very name and nature, manage to find happiness everywhere they go. Why?

They look around them and wonder at the wanders of human nature. They also wonder at the wanders of nature, full stop.

They take in what’s different, they take in what’s new. They compare, maybe, and then they move on.

The happy guiri is warm, not indifferent.

The smile behind his eyes takes in the whole world.

If he carries a camera, he still takes in life as he breathes and doesn’t just see the world through a rose-tinted lens. He might be “away” for two days, he might be “away” for two years, two decades…

Happy guiris know that there’s no place like home, but they also know that home is where the heart is. (They also speak in clichés every now and then.)

He’ll always feel like a guiri because he knows there’s a different way. But he will always be happy. A happy guiri.

“What is a guiri?” Guiri is the term that the Spanish use for foreigners, mainly for tourists, but not exclusively. I mainly hear it used affectionately now. In Spain, you can still spot a tourist or a foreigner; in London it’s a little bit harder. So a guiri is someone who breaks the mold, if only because their points of reference are different to most people around him/her. I now consider myself a guiri in Spain; I even look like one, especially when I walk around with my Dutch boyfriend who really looks the part. So, I’m a foreigner in the UK and a guiri in Spain. Maybe it’s because I’m a Londoner…

E is for Eurovisión 2013

Well, I missed most of it, I’d completely forgotten it was on, so I only caught it half way.

Not sure who’s won, but if Greece don’t win… well, they were the best, life is unfair…

The best act had to be Sweden’s own incredibly witty, well-written, self-mocking song, with lyrics like “seasoned with a hint of horse” (referring to their meatballs, of course). A great act to keep us staring at the TV while the audience voted.

Ironically, while there is so much talk in Britain (or should I say England after what happened in Scotland) of leaving the EU, most of the songs were in English. Plus, the Swedish song at one point could have been about Britain: people loving queues , standing in trains, not really making eye contact…

Are we really that different?

I suppose the answer is yes, but then, aren’t we constantly being bombarded here about the benefits of Diversity? Or has that agenda just gone out the window now? I suppose not, considering most of the countries sent singers to launch their careers, whereas the UK decided the festival would be a great full stop to the career of a legend.

E is for Extras on the Letter K

As promised, here are the other suggestions I was sent through when I asked for Spanish personalities to feature in a post on the letter K.

Karina
60’s pop singer.

Kiko Veneno
Spanish artist still going strong.

Kaka de Luxe
A punk-rock group formed in the late 70’s, headed by Alaska. Olvido Gara, who has always been known as Alaska, has managed to reinvent herself through the decades and still remains in the public spotlight.

Kiko (from Verano azul)
Most probably spelt Quico, but what a great excuse to talk about Verano azul in this blog.

Verano Azul (Blue Summer) made its mark on Spanish teenagers who watched TV in the 80’s. I remember the gang, on their bicycles, happily riding around the town where they spent their summer holidays. And the tune, oh the tune. If you’ve got two minutes, have a look: